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High-Intensity Workouts May Keep People Coming Back

Irregular Exercisers Find HIIT Enjoyable

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A study from McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ontario, has found that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) makes working out more enjoyable for individuals that struggle with regular exercise. Jennifer Heisz, lead author and assistant professor in the kinesiology department, observes, “Enjoyment during the first weeks of adopting a new exercise program may be especially important for preventing dropouts.”

Researchers divided 40 sedentary, healthy adults into two groups. One participated in HIIT, which consists of short bursts of intense exercises, followed by lower-intensity recovery periods, for six weeks; the other group performed ongoing moderate exercises. The researchers discovered that while both groups started out with equal enjoyment levels, the HIIT group enjoyed their workouts more as they gained strength, while the moderate group reported unchanged or decreased enjoyment levels.


This article appears in the June 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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